Applied Physiological Ecology of Fishes Lab Employment Opportunities

M.S. Assistantship in Aquaculture

Position or Title: M.S. Graduate Assistantship in Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology

Agency/State: Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, collaborating with the University of Idaho

Project background: Knowledge of the sensitivity of cultured burbot growth and performance when held under reduced dissolved oxygen and elevated ammonia concentrations can be considered a basic requirement for effective commercial culture of the species.  This is particularly important if burbot are used in a polyculture scenario where they are held in water that has first passed through other species culture systems (e.g., raceways holding rainbow trout). Studies on other species (e.g., Atlantic halibut, Hippoglossus hippoglossus) have shown that growth and associate performance measures (e.g., food conversion ratio) decline as the dissolved oxygen concentration is reduced.  Other studies have shown synergistic interactions between dissolved oxygen levels and increased ammonia concentrations (e.g. on spotted wolffish, Anarhichas minor) so this should also be studied for burbot.

Responsibilities: The student will participate in a 2-yr study evaluating the potential use of Burbot (Lota lota) as a niche species in commercial aquaculture.  The student will help design, install, and operate a fish culture system simulating a Burbot – Rainbow trout polyculture and will conduct a series of experiments exploring the effects of water quality on burbot production.  The student will be collaborating with researchers at the University of Idaho.

Qualifications: Required – B.S. degree in fisheries, aquatic ecology, aquaculture, biology, or related field; cumulative undergraduate GPA ≥ 3.0; combined average score > 70thpercentile on the Verbal and Quantitative sections of the GRE; strong writing, analytical, and presentation skills.

Desired – aquaculture experience in flow-through and recirculating systems; experience with feeding trials and water quality management; experience working with agencies and other stakeholders; interest in pursuing a career in aquaculture or fisheries management.

 Salary: Research & teaching assistantships provide annual stipends and tuition.

To apply: Please send unofficial copies of transcripts, GRE scores, names of 3 references, and a letter of application to Dr. Christopher Myrick at the email address below.

Ad Closing date: Until filled.  Applications will be reviewed beginning 5/14/2018.  Please note: If you are planning on taking the GRE on June 3rd 2018, please indicate this with our cover letter and/or email.

Start date: August 2018

Contact/Email: Dr. Christopher Myrick      email: chris.myrick@colostate.edu

 


M.S. Assistantship in Fish Physiological Ecology

Position or Title: M.S. Graduate Assistantship in fish physiological ecology

Agency/State: Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, collaborating with Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

Project Background: Severe flooding impacted many Front Range transition zone stream during September 2013, damaging most of the diversion structures in the South Platte basin. After the flood, a handful of ditch companies incorporated fishways into reconstruction of their diversions, despite limited funding and permitting concerns. The structures that did incorporate fish passages primarily used pool-weir fish ladders, a concept originally designed for salmonid passage. The pool-weir fish ladder was conceived, designed and tested in the Pacific Northwest for streams dominated largely by anadromous salmonids that will attempt to jump over obstacles and may not be effective for passing small-bodied fishes native to Front Range transition zone streams. Nevertheless, it is being used as an example for fish passage projects along the Colorado Front Range. The effectiveness of this design (along with other fishway types) should be evaluated for passage of all fish species native to Front Range transition zone streams prior to recommending their widespread adoption elsewhere.

In the years since the flood, other new fishway types besides pool-weir ladders were designed and implemented across Front Range streams, including engineered rock ramps, nature-like bypass channels, and constructed riffles.  Native fish passage rates can be compared across a range of fishway design options to determine their relative effectiveness. Types of fish passage structures targeted for evaluation in this study include: pool-weir fishways with orifice-type openings, nature-like bypasses, fish notches at whitewater parks, wing-wall bypass structures at whitewater parks, engineered rock ramps, and constructed artificial riffles.

Responsibilities: The student will participate in a 2-yr study evaluating how existing fish passage structures improve the ecological connectivity of streams on Colorado’s Front Range.  The goal is to identify the best fish passage options for fish in these transition zone and plains systems.

Qualifications: Required – B.S. degree in fisheries, aquatic ecology, biology, or related field; cumulative undergraduate GPA ≥ 3.0; combined average score > 70thpercentile on the Verbal and Quantitative sections of the GRE; strong writing, analytical, and presentation skills.

Desired – experience collecting fish on streams and rivers; experience with PIT tags and remote PIT tag antennas; experience working with agencies and other stakeholders; interest in pursuing a career in fisheries management.

Salary: Research & teaching assistantships provide annual stipends and tuition.

To apply: Please send unofficial copies of transcripts, GRE scores, names of 3 references, and a letter of application to Dr. Christopher Myrick at the email address below.

Ad Closing date: Until filled.  Applications will be reviewed beginning 5/14/2018.  Please note: If you are planning on taking the GRE on June 3rd 2018, please indicate this with our cover letter and/or email.

Start date: August 2018

Contact/Email: Dr. Christopher Myrick      email: chris.myrick@colostate.edu