Welcome to Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology

WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
WCNR - Whats Your Path?
We expand the frontiers of knowledge through our broad-based expertise in applied ecology, quantitative methods, and human dimensions in the conservation and management of fish and wildlife.

We teach students to think critically about environmental issues, and become ecologically literate citizens with the training to be successful in graduate school and in careers with natural resources agencies, firms, and non-government organizations.

Our outreach efforts contribute significantly to life-long learning by assisting individuals and agencies to solve complex environmental problems and to be good stewards of our nation's natural resources.

Dr. Mevin Hooten Received Award

Dr. Mevin Hooten Received Award
Mevin B. Hooten, Assistant Unit Leader in the Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Unit and Associate Professor at Colorado State University, received the Young Investigator Award from the American Statistical Association, Section on Statistics and the Environment, at the 2014 Joint Stat...

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Researcher Graeme Shannon Uses Sound to Make Unprecedented Wildlife Behavior Discoveries

Researcher Graeme Shannon Uses Sound to Make Unprecedented Wildlife Behavior Discoveries
New research has found that elephants are able to identify humans that pose a threat to them by distinguishing ethnicity, gender, and age from acoustic cues in human voices. Graeme Shannon, now a post-doctoral behavioral ecologist at Colorado State University’s Warner College of Natural Resources,...

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New study verifies more than 100,000 elephants in Africa killed in three years

New study verifies more than 100,000 elephants in Africa killed in three years
New research led by Colorado State University has revealed that an estimated 100,000 elephants in Africa were killed for their ivory between 2010 and 2012. The study shows these losses are driving population declines of the world's wild African elephants on the order of 2 percent to 3 percent a year...

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